Mosajco

Villa Fiorentino Sorrento sede della Fondazione Sorrento

Fondazione Sorrento

The legend of Dead Christ’s statue

According to charming popular tales, the statue carried in procession in Sorrento, in the evening of Holy Friday, would have been made by a noble knight who would have achieved a right of asylum in the Church of San Catello. Surely among the oldest in Europe and all over the world, the Black Procession occurring on Holy Friday in Sorrento is rich in charm and suggestions for its aspect and its meanings. And, as any tradition whose origins are lost in the mists of time, it is made even more attractive by the existence of some legends fruit of popular tales handed down for centuries from generation to generation from father to son. Right among these legends one in particular concerns the wonderful wooden statue of Dead Christ which gathers the immense veneration of all Sorrento people and arouses the emotion of those able to admire it. Of this real work of art which portrays dead Jesus lying on a shroud with an expression of painful relaxation, not only the author, but also the exact date of making is ignored. Actually, according to an old legend, it would have been made by a noble knight, unfairly charged with lese-majesty, taken shelter in the Church of San Catello to ask for right of asylum. According to the fabulous reconstruction, the noble – helped by his brothers – would have sculptured the statue as a homage for a vow taken in order that his innocence was recognized. The fact would have happened miraculously with the finishing of the statue itself. Actually, there are two well-founded reasons fostering uncertainty on the reliability of this legend. Probably, in fact, the people - in the course of the years – has drawn the idea to articulate this reconstruction from a really happened fact (always in Sorrento) to the famous artist Nicola Vaccaro. This one –actually taken shelter in the Church of San Catello – in 1648, to thank the brothers who had offered him a generous and exquisite hospitality, enriched the holy building with wonderful stucco statues. By mixing this real story with the vague news about the author of the wooden statue, instead, a tale, which, still today, is able to keep its unquestionable charm unchanged, would have arisen. Anyway, according to scholars, the sculpture portraying the Dead Christ is much older than the time when Vaccaro lived. In admiring its making, moreover, it is possible to assert that its author certainly had the chance to draw inspiration – or anyway take into consideration – from the Christ of Michelangelo’s Pieta'.


folclore
Libro Trattoria da Emilia

Ci sono dei locali che non sono solo un punto di ritrovo, ma rappresentano ... Continue

Sorrento & Folklore

Sorrento & Folklore - A popular, yet genuine way of displaying a pictur... Continue

The old tradition of Palms of sugar-coated almonds.

A profane legend exalts the sweetness of a gesture considered sacred. Continue

The Sorrentine Tarantella

The most famous popular dance in the world under the Sorrentine interpretat... Continue

Salve D’Espostito – Sorrento composer

Short biography of composer Salve D' Esposito, glory of the Sorrento Coast ... Continue

International Folclore Festival

The Sorrento Town Council, in collaboration with Sorrento Folk, organizes t... Continue

L 'Epifania tutte le feste porta via

La Befana ha occupato la casa di Babbo Natale a Villa Fiorentino! Invitiamo... Continue

Visit the photogallery

 

Would you like to receive our exclusive special offers or to be updated regularly on news and events? Register for our free newsletter!

SUBSCRIBE

Rosa e Gabriele - 03/01/2018
Complimenti per la mostra! Geniale l'idea di affiancare un laboratorio dimostrativo che ... Continue »

Read the opinions of our clients »


visit www.webpinknetwork.it Fondazione Sorrento Headquarters: Corso Italia, 53 - Sorrento - 80067 - Italia P.IVA / Cod.Fiscale: 05574541214
Phone: 081 8782284 - E-mail: info@fondazionesorrento.com

Powered by Mosajco CMS